There are two different types of laundry equipment out there, and both are designed for contrasting environments. It’s important to know the distinctions between the two styles of machinery because they aren’t interchangeable. Learn more about the differences between commercial and residential laundry machines to get a clear idea of what they both offer.

Purpose

The first major distinction between commercial and residential laundry equipment is their purpose. Residential laundry equipment is what you place in a home, while commercial equipment is used in hotels, dry cleaning facilities, and other industrial environments.

Capacity

With commercial laundry equipment, the amount you can wash at once is far greater than what you can wash in a residential machine. This is because a commercial machine is designed to get far more use on a daily basis and to handle a greater influx of items that need to be cleaned. Residential laundry machines can handle a load capacity of no more than 20 pounds, but ones designed for commercial use can take on much more.

Durability and Longevity

A commercial laundry machine is also far more durable than a machine you’d find in a home. Commercial machines have a lot more innerworkings that allow a greater workflow and better efficiency. Commercial equipment also needs to be durable and to withstand all the use it goes through. It’s also more expensive, but it will last longer than a residential washer or dryer since its parts get serviced often.

Size

The final difference between commercial and residential laundry machines is their size. You can spot the difference at first glance because commercial machines are big and bulky. A commercial unit would be unlikely to fit in a home, and there’s no reason for it to. A residential laundry machine will surely take care of your dirty clothes and towels with ease. Commercial machines take on more production, and their footprint reflects that.

Denise Lockwood has an extensive background in traditional and non-traditional media. She has written for Patch.com, the Milwaukee Business Journal, Milwaukee Magazine and the Kenosha News.