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For the United States, daylight savings time begins at 2 a.m. Sunday, March 8 so you’ll have to set your clocks an hour ahead.

But some experts say our “make hay while the sun is shining” attitude has an impact on our health,” according to a story in the Los Angeles Times.

We started “saving time” to conserve energy and make summer evenings a little longer. But Yvonne Harrison, a sleep specialist at Liverpool John Moores University, said the time change actually has a more cumulative effect on sleep loss.

The story outlines several areas affected including: traffic accidents, heart attacks, and physical activity.

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Denise Lockwood has an extensive background in traditional and non-traditional media. She has written for Patch.com, the Milwaukee Business Journal, Milwaukee Magazine and the Kenosha News.