There are headstones standing at the northeast corner of the American Metal Technologies surrounded by a black, wrought iron fence.

Some long-time Sturtevant residents know the small graveyard is there, but other neighbors probably didn’t realize one of the village’s founding families is buried there.

Sturtevant was founded around 1854 by settlers Hezekia Johnson and Peter Knudson, but the new town wasn’t named after either one of them.

Instead, Parkersville took its name from Stillman Parker, a wealthy landowner who laid claim to at least 25 acres as well as several other plots in the area. He moved to Wisconsin with his first wife, Lucinda, and had 11 children with her. After Lucinda’s death, Stillman married Hannah Thom and had another 11 children with her.

It is Parker and members of his family who are buried there though it is unknown if Lucinda, Hannah or both wives are buried with their husband.

Sturtevant was called many things before village leaders decided to stick with its current name; Parkersville (1854), Western Union Junction (1877), Corliss (1890s), and, finally in 1923, Sturtevant for the B.F. Sturtevant company.

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