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Like it or not, work is where people spend the majority of their time each week. As such, it’s important that they’re happy in their place of employment and that they enjoy being there each day. One of the best ways for companies to accomplish this is to set up a positive atmosphere in which their employees can thrive. Learn how to create a positive work environment so that your employees want to come to work every day.

Foster Clear Communication

When communication breaks down between management and employees, frustration can reach an all-time high. As a result, workers are less likely to look positively at the situation, and the collective atmosphere of the workplace diminishes. Employees should have a clear understanding of what’s expected of them, and managers should put effort into learning what their teams need to succeed.

Create Break Areas

Remaining positive is hard when you’re feeling fatigued or burnt out. For this reason, employers should provide their workers with designated break areas in which they can unwind. When they include all the break room essentials, these spaces are perfect for allowing individuals to occasionally decompress and refocus.

Recognize Achievements

Employees want to know that their hard work is paying off. Recognizing them for their achievements is a great way to foster positive work relationships and to further motivate them to pursue career growth. Over time, companies that recognize their employees often see increased employee retention as well as overall comfort in their roles.

Be Open to New Ideas

Employees want to ultimately feel like their managers are listening to their concerns. As such, it’s beneficial for upper management to be open to new ideas from their employees and to accept any feedback they have to give. This makes workers feel as though they have some say in the decisions being made and that their managers care enough to hear them out.

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In addition to our education features, we’ll be kicking off a series of stories highlighting how parents, students, and educators are adapting to the impact of COVID-19 on education. If this is important to you, please consider donating to our education reporting fund. https://business.facebook.com/donate/1846323118855149/3262802717172659/

Denise Lockwood has an extensive background in traditional and non-traditional media. She has written for Patch.com, the Milwaukee Business Journal, Milwaukee Magazine and the Kenosha News.