**Editor’s Note: Racine County Democratic Party Chair Meg Andrietsch reported from the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, PA.

The last day of the Democratic National Convention started at 730am with breakfast, where we heard from several speakers including Congressman Keith Ellison, LA Mayor Eric Garcetti, and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack.

Then we went to Caucus and Committee meetings. DNC Caucuses and Councils represented the following groups: Black, Hispanic, Women, Asian American/Pacific Islander, LGBT, Ethnic, Native American, Disability, Small Business Owners, Veterans and Military Families, Labor, Faith, Senior, Rural, and Youth.  Each group meets twice during the National conventions.  
 
Hillary Clinton’s acceptance speech was Thursday night, and we were told to get to the Wells Fargo Center early to be sure we had a place to sit.  Delegates got priority, but there were many many guests.
I got there around 315 and the place was already loud and crowded.
 
The Wisconsin delegates decided to wear cheeseheads for the last night of convention.  I never wore one before, but it was a fun experience.  They are very warm, so I now understand why people wear them at Packer games at Lambeau in December.  The press seemed to enjoy our cheeseheads, and most of us gave several interviews on Thursday.  I was told that the cheeseheads made us easy to spot on the television.
 
During the week, we had musical entertainment each night.  Some of the performers were Boys 2 Men, Andra Day, Paul Simon, Lenny Kravitz, Alicia Keys, Sheila E, Carole King, and Katy Perry.  We also heard from Meryl Streep, Ted Danson and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.
 
On Thursday, we had some notable speeches before Chelsea and then her mom Hillary spoke.  Wisconsin’s own (and Racine native) Congresswoman Gwen Moore talked about women’s issues, and Wisconsin’s US Senator Tammy Baldwin talked about childhood illnesses and health insurance.  Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth from Illinois was inspiring when telling how she was injured while in the US Military.
 
Former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm got the crowd energized, and Khizr Khan moved us all to tears.  Reverend William Barber showed us what a great preacher does best – he was inspiring.
 
The Wells Fargo Center was full to capacity well before 8pm.  The Fire Marshall closed the doors around then, and if you were not already in the building, you were not going to get in.  
 
Chelsea Clinton introduced her mom with a touching speech.  Finally, it was our nominee’s turn.  
Hillary Clinton accepted the nomination and talked about her plans for the country.  She compared her accomplishments, credentials, and proposals to those of her opponent.  She found him lacking in nearly all areas.
 
When all the speeches were done, we participated in a card stunt.  We each had a red, white, or blue card that we held up to our faces and peered through a peephole in the card.  It looked great from the floor, and it was great fun.  We had fireworks, too, from the sides of the stage and from the top of the stage.
 
Then came the balloon drop.  I’ve been to several conventions and involved in the balloon drop, but this was outstanding.  I looked straight up and watched hundreds of blue balloons drop down on us, followed by a batch of white balloons, and then red balloons, until the balloons were knee deep.  The aisles were full of balloons.  Finally the confetti was dropped.  It was a unique feeling, standing in mounds of balloons, with red, white, and blue confetti sprinkling down all over.  I collected a handful of the confetti from this historic night, just like I did at the DNC Conventions of 2008 and 2012.
 
This convention was special and meaningful because we finally nominated a woman for President of the United States.  I deeply appreciated the opportunity to attend and represent Democrats in the 1st Congressional District of Wisconsin.  I will always remember and cherish the experience.

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